Sandwich Day 2018

Sandwich Day

This November 3rd, we are celebrating Sandwich Day. If you’ve never heard of it, don’t worry (Sandwich Day, not actual sandwiches – that would be a tad worrying, because everyone needs a good mayo-fish/cheeseburger/cheese and salami sandwich once in a while)…

It is a favorite dish throughout the world, East and West, North and South. No one discriminates, and everyone takes part in this feast for the senses. There are much more varied, complex, and even tasty dishes in the world – but few can take on the cultural significance of the sandwich.

So, in order to pay it the tribute it deserves, we celebrate Sandwich Day. Coincidentally, 3rd November is the birthday of John Montague, the 4th Duke of Sandwich. The story goes like this: this 18th-century nobleman had decided he wants to eat his lunch with one hand during his 24-hour gambling sessions. So, in order to simplify his food intake, he ordered his servants to serve his usual lunch of meat between two slices of bread.

Genius, right?

Okay, so you all know what a sandwich is. It is a dish consisting of two slices of bread (whatever shape or form), and various fillings between them (meat, fish, ham, cheese – basically, if you can fit it between the two slices, it counts as a sandwich). Since its creation in the 18th century, its popularity has skyrocketed. We’re talking McDonald’s, Burger King, Subway, etc. – and, as you may or may not know, burgers are a type of sandwich.

However, traditional sandwiches and their recipes wildly differ from country to country. We’ve put together a short list to introduce 28 different tasty sandwiches from all over the world. Let’s go:

  1. Chacarero (Chile)

A traditional Chilean sandwich made of thinly cut beef steak or pork in a round piece of flatbread. Additional ingredients are tomatoes and chili.

  1. Cemita (Mexico)

Made of avocado, various meats, cottage cheese if available, onion and special read sauce (real recipe rarely divulged to foreigners), all baked to perfection and served in a specially made piece of bread.

  1. Chip Butty (UK)

A sandwich with a weird name, Chip Butty is an interesting piece of work made in the United Kingdom (Brits eat it the most). It is a bunch of chips served between two hamburger slices of bread, topped with ketchup or sauce.

  1. Barros Luco (Chile)

Barros Luco is named after the Chilean president, who kept eating and ordering it from various eateries around the city. It is a plain-looking sandwich, with beef and melted cheese served in a piece of flatbread. Don’t know, we get the feeling the Chileans like their sandwiches, right?

  1. Chivito (Uruguay)

Chivito means small goat or child, and contains a little bit of everything – a piece of beef with mozzarella, tomatoes, mayo, olives, and sometimes even bacon, ham and eggs.

  1. Choripan (South America)

A South-America favorite, it was first made in Argentina in the beginning of the 20th century. The sandwich consists of a special frankfurter with chimichurri or pebre sauce.

  1. Donkey Burger (China)

Donkey burgers are a delicacy in China. They come with lettuce and paprika, and the bread is unusually crispy and melts in the mouth. How do you know if the sandwich is any good? Well, it turns out the Chinese have a proverb that goes: “In heaven, they eat dragon meat, and on Earth the meat of a donkey.” So, you know… millennia of wisdom can’t be wrong.

  1. Doubles (Trinidad and Tobago)

Often nibbled on before bed, the Doubles is a popular toasted sandwich in Trinidad and Tobago. It’s made of chickpeas dipped in curry. Also, you can add mango, cucumbers, and coconut. Even though this does sound like a flavor bomb, we figure the different tastes make for an unbelievable sandwich once you get used to it.

  1. Smorrebrod (Denmark)

Known as an open sandwich, the famous Danish Smorrebrod is a taste extravaganza. It consists of a piece of buttered rye bread, cold cuts, meat or fish, as well as cheese or spreads. Smorrebrod is a popular and well-liked sandwich in Denmark – and rightfully so.

  1. Doner kebab (Turkey)

Popular in Europe (especially Southeast Europe and the UK), the Doner Kebab is a specially made kebab-type sandwich. Meat, tomatoes, onions, lettuce, cucumbers or chili are placed within a piece of flatbread make for an amazing treat. One word of advice, kebabs are usually cut from large slabs of meat which can often go bad due to exposure – when you pick out a kebab place, make sure it’s really, really busy – this way you’ll know that the meat you’re eating is as fresh as it can be.

  1. Fischbrotchen (Germany)

Crispy bread rolls with fish (mainly pickled herring), with a lot of raw onions. The fish is often dipped into special sauces and makes for a lovely eat.

  1. Gatsby (South Africa)

The main ingredient is fried potatoes. The sandwich is huge, enough for four people, and is therefore often ordered by larger groups of people.

  1. Katsu-sando (Japan)

Katsu-sando is a minimalistic sandwich with a slice of pork (a Japanese specialty) and chopped cabbage.

  1. Leberkassemmel (Germany)

Leberkassemmel means liver cheese, even though it doesn’t contain liver or cheese. It’s made of various meats, bacon, and onion, and bread twisted into a pretzel. It is only served hot, oily and with a side of mustard.

  1. Medianoche (Cuba)

A very popular snack in Cuba, Medianoche is a sandwich made of pork, ham, mustard, cheese, and pickles. It is served in a sweetish bun that offers a great contrast in taste.

  1. Mettbrotchen (Germany)

Chopped (sometimes raw) meat with onion on a piece of tasty bread. What’s not to love?

  1. Pan bagnat (France)

A classy French sandwich made with tuna, various greens, a boiled egg and olive oil. People have often tried using mayo or ketchup here, but it distorts the very fragile taste synergy. The bread is made of a special kind of sourdough.

  1. Burger (Serbia)

We all know how good a nice hamburger tastes, right? Serbian burgers are made from a mix of minced meat (sometimes with onion), dipped in cream, stuffed into an oily, slightly burned piece of flatbread.

  1. Banh Mi (Vietnam)

A classic Vietnamese sandwich with pork, chopped pickles, pickled baby carrot and coriander. The sandwich is pretty cheap to make, slightly less cheaper to buy, and always great-tasting. If you’re ever visiting Vietnam, do go ahead any look out for one – they are amazing.

  1. Roti John (Malaysia)

A simple sandwich made between two slices of half-toasted bread. It contains various meats, fish, eggs and onions, and is a very popular dish in Malaysia.

  1. Meat burger (China)

A popular Chinese sandwich you can often buy on the street. It contains meat (mostly pork, but also lamb and veal, depending on the region), hot peppers and spices in a thin piece of bread.

  1. Kaya toast (Singapore)

Kaya is placed between two thin pieces of bread, a blend of coconut and sugar. People sometimes add eggs to it, which accentuates the flavour. It is an unusual combination which is either loved or hated – there is no middle ground.

  1. Arepas (Venezuela)

Arepas are little round corn breads with cheese, avocado, pork and various other ingredients (these can be mixed and matched, depending on your mood).

  1. Hawaii toast (Germany)

Germany is a country of sandwiches, and the Germans love eating them. One of their specialties is Hawaii toast. Pineapple, ham, melted cheese and maraschino cherry are fit between two pieces of toast. Much like the Singaporean Kaya toast, you either love it or hate it.

  1. Vada Pav (India)

A vegetarian sandwich made with a spicy potato paste very popular in India.

  1. Yakisoba-pan (Japan)

Yakisoba-pan is a sandwich of an unusual name and a very special flavour. It is made of fried Japanese noodles, very little pork, vegetables and special sauce.

  1. Zapiekanka (Poland)

A famous sandwich made of half a baguette, mushrooms, melted cheese, meat and vegetables. It comes in many different variants, shapes and size, and is a very popular dish in Poland.

  1. Fluffernutter (SAD)

This is quite an unusual sandwich with peanut butter and marshmallow fluff. It is extremely caloric, but undoubtedly extremely tasty.

So, ladies and gentlemen, this concludes our 28 sandwiches list.

We hope you are hungry.

From the entire crew at Hipper, we wish you a bon appetite!

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Florence Hazel is a full-time writer with a Masters in English and Sociology. Florence believes that if a single person benefits in some way from her writing, be it physically, emotionally, mentally, or any other kind of –ally, her job was a job well done. She made it her goal to sell happiness and well-being as much as she does flowers and cards. To quote the song Florence starts obsessively humming when words get muddled at the end of an 8-hour workday, “One, two, three, my writing opts for clarity!”
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